Heritage Funding Directory

Heritage Update #275 is out!

Heritage 275The latest Heritage Update e-bulletin is now out Friday 4th April, and emailed directly to our subscribers.

Heritage Update is our voice to, and for, the sector. The popular fortnightly e-bulletin offers policy updates, news, a consultation round-up, events / course listings and job vacancies. Update reaches an estimated 12500 mailboxes in the UK and internationally, with readers as far afield as Abu Dhabi, Antarctica, Istanbul and California.

The most recent back copy (21st March) and all other archive copies can be downloaded here. To subscribe and receive a copy directly to your inbox two weeks before it’s available online, please email your details to matthew.rab@theheritagealliance.org.uk, or click on the subscribe button here.

 

The Heritage Alliance Heroes awards open for applications!

The Heritage Alliance Heroes awards 2014 are now open for applications! 20131205_HeritageAlliance_QU6A15941111

The Heritage Alliance Heroes award scheme was established to celebrate the outstanding contribution to society made by heritage volunteers in England. Now in its fifth year, previous recipients include Portland WorksBluebell Heritage RailwayGorton Monastery in Manchester, and the SS Shieldhall in Southampton.

The Award scheme is open to all Alliance member organisations and their members. Entries should demonstrate a distinctive achievement in the past 12 months by a voluntary individual or team. Applying or nominating couldn’t be easier – please submit a short nomination form and send to Alliance Trustee, Denis Dunstone denis.dunstone@talktalk.net. The deadline for applications is 15th September 2014.

The winner will be asked to present a five minute video showcasing the achievement for presentation at The Heritage Alliance’s AGM & Heritage Day on 4th December 2014. The winner will also receive a memento of the event.

The Heritage Alliance Heroes Award 2014 is kindly sponsored by Ecclesiastical Insurance Group.

The Alliance responds on #newEH model

NEweh.102524The Heritage Alliance has submitted its response to DCMS on the proposal to establish from 2015 a new charity to manage the National Heritage Collection, alongside the renaming of the heritage protection services as Historic England. Taking into account the views of its members expressed at the December AGM, it is open about the principle of separation, welcomes the continuation of public ownership and guardianship for the National Collection and in particular the explicit endorsement by Government that investing in repair, maintenance and interpretation is the best strategy to prevent the terminal decline of our valuable and  irreplaceable heritage.

Concluding however that the consultation document lacked enough detail to categorically agree or disagree with the proposals, The Alliance has set out a series of recommendations aimed at minimising the financial and other risks to both the new charity and to Historic England. It points out that the National Heritage Collection, important as these assets are, comprises only 0.05% of designated heritage assets in England. Historic England’s corporate strategy and its mechanisms  for working in partnership with others is the key challenge. Throughout, the Alliance refers to the importance of public consultation in shaping these bodies to be fit for the purpose.

For the Alliance’s full response see here.

  •  All Party Parliamentary Archaeology Group response
  • Ancient Monuments Society [Alliance member] response
  • Architects Accredited in Building Conservation [Alliance member] response
  • Architectural & Archaeological Society of Durham & Northumberland response
  • Association for Industrial Archaeology [Alliance member] response
  • Association of England Cathedrals [Alliance member] response
  • Bath Preservation Trust response
  • Battlefields Trust [Alliance member] response
  • Bloomsbury Conservation Advisory Committee response
  • British Property Federation [Alliance member] response
  • Campaign to Protect Rural England [Alliance member] response
  • Chester Archaeological Society Chester Archaeological response
  • Church of England response
  • Churches Conservation Trust [Alliance member] response
  • Civic Voice [Alliance member] response
  • Cotswold Conservation Trust response
  • Council for British Archaeology [Alliance member] response
  • Country Land & Business Association (CLA) [Alliance member] response
  • English Heritage response
  • Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers [FAME] [Alliance member]  response
  • Historic Towns Forum and Association of Small historic towns and villages of the UK response [Alliance member's] response
  • Historic Houses Association [Alliance member] response
  • Heritage Crafts Association [Alliance member] response  
  • Heritage Lottery Fund response
  • Heritage Railways Association [Alliance member] response  
  • Jewish Heritage UK [Alliance member] response
  • Joint Committee of the National Amenity Societies response
  • Institute for Archaeologists [Alliance member] response
  • Institute of Conservation [Alliance member] response 
  • London Forum of Amenity and Civic Societies [Alliance member] response
  • National Parks England response
  • The National Trust [Alliance member] response
  • RESCUE: The British Archaeological Trust [Alliance member] response
  • Royal Archaeological Institute [Alliance member] response
  • Society of Antiquaries [Alliance member] response
  • The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings [Alliance member] response
  • South East Region Association of Preservation Trusts [Alliance Member] response
  • University Campus Suffolk Heritage [Alliance member] response
  • Woodland Trust and Ancient Tree Forum response

UPDATE – 18/03/2014 – Secretary of State summarises responses on new English Heritage Model 

The DCMS consultation on the English Heritage New Model closed on 7th February with over 600 replies received of which 218 were from organisations.  Secretary of State, Maria Miller, has written to all respondents claiming that ‘nearly two thirds of those who responded agreed or strongly agreed with our proposals’.

DCMS is giving full consideration to the concerns raised and will publish a full response to the consultation with additional detail in the summer. The first point in her holding analysis on the proposed new charity calculates that 20% strongly agreed with the proposed benefits, 40% somewhat agreed, 14% somewhat disagreed and 8% strongly disagreed. This means the remaining 18% (including The Heritage Alliance) neither agreed or disagreed or gave a don’t know answer. The second point indicates that respondents required more detail to make a better informed judgment, looking for the fuller business case and in particular on the earned income projections. Other concerns lay in the long term future, governance arrangements, maintaining its specialist expertise and how it would act as ‘owner of last resort’.

On ‘Historic England’, the main points include a strong wish for more detail on how this would operate and its priorities. A key point here was the need for Historic England to be adequately funded and that its funding should be kept separate from that of the new charity. There was also a firm wish to be involved in the shaping of Historic England thorough further consultation and stakeholder engagement.

Click here to see a copy of the Secretary of State’s letter, and also click here to view the preliminary analysis.

Concerns have also been raised about the new EH model by the Institute for Archaeologists [Alliance member] and Council for British Archaeology [Alliance member] in an interesting article in the Independent this week.

Please send your responses and hyperlinks to Matthew Rabagliati, Policy & Communications Officer, The Heritage Alliance at matthew.rab@theheritagealliance.org.uk

Heritage Update is out

THA update 273

The latest Heritage Update e-bulletin is now out Friday 7th March, and emailed directly to our subscribers.

Heritage Update is our voice to, and for, the sector. The popular fortnightly e-bulletin offers policy updates, news, a consultation round-up, events / course listings and job vacancies. Update reaches an estimated 12500 mailboxes in the UK and internationally, with readers as far afield as Abu Dhabi, Antarctica, Istanbul and California.

The most recent back copy (7th March) and all other archive copies can be downloaded here. To subscribe and receive a copy directly to your inbox two weeks before it’s available online, please email your details to matthew.rab@theheritagealliance.org.uk, or click on the subscribe button here.

Giving to Heritage Project Officer now in post

 

The Heritage Alliance is very pleased to welcome Mark Webb who will be driving our major two year Giving to Heritage project. Mark has considerable experience in the media/telecommunications industry. He has an MBA, an MA in Archaeology from UCL and recently completed an internship with English Heritage. He will be a great addition to our team.

Giving to Heritage, supported by HLF under the Catalyst Umbrella programme and delivered in partnership with the Institute of Fundraising, is the Alliance’s exciting new project to build fundraising capacity within the independent heritage movement combining the Alliance’s unsurpassed networks with the Institute’s professional expertise. A new website to carry all information, resources and registrations will be launched in the early summer.

Heritage Update is out!

The latest Heritage Update e-bulletin is now out Friday 7th March, and emailed directly to our subscribers.

Heritage Update is our voice to, and for, the sector. The popular fortnightly e-bulletin offers policy updates, news, a consultation round-up, events / course listings and job vacancies. Update reaches an estimated 12500 mailboxes in the UK and internationally, with readers as far afield as Abu Dhabi, Antarctica, Istanbul and California.

The most recent back copy (21st February) and all other archive copies can be downloaded here. To subscribe and receive a copy directly to your inbox two weeks before it’s available online, please email your details to matthew.rab@theheritagealliance.org.uk, or click on the subscribe button here.

Full Speech: Loyd Grossman calls on Ministers to make a reduction in VAT to 5% policy for next UK Government

Speech at Cut the VAT coalition event, House of Parliament Terrace, 3rd March 2014

Today I am addressing you not only as the Chairman of the Heritage Alliance, but as a spokesperson for the Cut the VAT Campaign – a broad coalition of more than 60 charities, business groups, trade associations and financial institutions.

We are all united in our support for a reduction in VAT on housing renovation and repair work from 20% to 5%.

In support of that we are launching a new independent research report from Experian which clearly shows that a targeted reduction in VAT on housing renovation and repair from 2015 to 2020 – that is the lifetime of the next Parliament – could bring a number of significant economic, social and environmental benefits.

VAT is simply a crazy tax regime that discriminates against the repair and adaptation of older buildings.

The figures in this new research are significant to the national economy. The vast bulk of private housing renovation and repair work is carried out by small and medium sized enterprises who make a significant contribution to sometimes fragile local and particularly rural economies.

This Experian report shows a cut in VAT on housing renovation and repair could provide a huge economic stimulus of more than £15 billion over the five-year period to 2020.

This VAT reduction could also create more than 42,000 extra full-time construction jobs as well as an additional 53,000 jobs in the wider economy by 2020.

As we are on the eve of the Eco Build conference, which opens tomorrow at EXEL, I would also like to remind you of the environmental benefits of this VAT reduction.

If this VAT reduction creates a 5% rise in demand for housing renovation and repair work, around £1bn extra could be spent on energy efficiency measures by 2020. This could lead to almost 92,000 homes installing loft and wall insulation, double-glazing and energy efficient boilers creating a saving of up to 237,000 tonnes of CO2.

Furthermore, according to a recent study by the University of East Anglia, households are far more likely to install energy efficiency measures as part of general renovations, while only one in ten householders indicate that they would consider efficiency-only renovations. So the report concludes that energy efficiency work is much more likely to be bundled together and carried out with general renovation work. Consequently the reduction of VAT from 20% to 5% on the labour element of all housing renovation and repair could also deliver even greater carbon savings!

For example the refurbishment of older properties consumes fewer renewable resources. The environmental benefits of maintaining older housing stock in good condition are significant. A reduced rate of VAT will support energy and climate change objectives.

With my Heritage Alliance hat on, I can go further: Houses are among our most important historic assets, they make up around 40% of our listed buildings.

Then there are all the old, attractive but unlisted domestic buildings that provide continuity, character and context. I want to turn now to the Historic Environment.  The quality and diversity of our historic environment is universally admired.  It is the key driver to the success of our huge tourism industry.  Even more importantly it provides the context in which creativity and enterprise can flourish.  Heritage is infrastructure.

It is dangerously wrong to think that the pleasures and responsibility of living in a listed building are the prerogative of the rich.  Over 80% of our listed buildings are owned by people in social classes B-D.  They don’t get grants, they can’t claim back VAT like commercial companies. It’s very short sighted not to give people incentives to make sure the historic environment is around for the future and continues to deliver economic, social and cultural benefits.

And in the aftermath of the floods, an immediate 5% rate would support flood victims in their recovery as well as boost construction.

And what I want to do tonight is put to bed some of the common misconceptions about our proposal:

The Treasury would lose revenue via the reduction in the value of its VAT receipts, but this is more than made up for by the estimated £15 billion of stimulus in the wider economy created by higher workloads, more jobs and less competition to professional builders from those working in the black economy. It is utterly shortsighted to rebuff this proposal based purely on the reduction in the value of VAT receipts – we need to think of the bigger picture here.

Contrary to popular belief the European Union allows member states to reduce VAT on housing renovation and repair from 20% to 5%. To say otherwise is simply incorrect (see VAT Directive 2006/112/EC if you don’t believe me!).

In fact, 12 of the EU member states charge a reduced rate on this type of work and unlike the UK, they are currently enjoying the various benefits it can bring. There is clear evidence in the Experian report of the positive impact this has had in the Netherlands and even closer to home, in the Isle of Man where the 5% rate has been in force since  2000.;

This new research gives us powerful responses in our campaign to change the VAT framework.  Previously the Treasury have not been willing to engage.  They can’t ignore what we have to say now.  I would remind them of Oliver Cromwell’s words: ‘Think it possible you may be mistaken’.

I would like to conclude by urging all political parties to include this proposal in their forthcoming general election manifestos. For those MPs in the room, if you are not actually writing the manifesto, help us to influence those that are. We want cross-party consensus on this and will be speaking to all relevant Ministers, Shadow Ministers and manifesto authors in the coming months to discuss with them the benefits of this proposal. Quite simply, a single targeted VAT reduction in housing renovation and repair would help the next government secure economic growth, boost jobs and reduce our carbon emissions.

It is time to do as our European neighbours do and reduce VAT on housing renovation and repair. Thank you.

You can also see a Dods monitoring report on the event here